Panel 1

Performing Sexuality, Collectivity, and Indigeneity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This panel reflects on how Filipino/a indigeneity—in the Philippines and beyond—allow us to re-imagine our understanding of collectivity, responsibility, and belonging in Canada. How might performance and art serve as important frameworks for thinking about our role as settler colonizers, and as people living in the Global North? What is our responsibility in terms of consciousness raising and social change? How might Filipino/a indigenous identity encourage use to reflect on questions of gender and sexual equality, diversity, equity, and sustainability? Participants in this panel will center on their work and consciousness raising efforts around questions of Filipino/a indigeneity, in order to understand and create new forms of belonging within and beyond Canada.

About the Speakers

 

Jo SiMalaya Alcampo

Interdisciplinary Artist

 

Jo SiMalaya Alcampo is an interdisciplinary artist born in Manila and raised in Malvern in the heart of Scarborough. Jo currently lives in Toronto on traditional territories of the Huron-Wendat Nation, the Haudenosaunee ("People of the Longhouse"), the Anishinaabe, and the Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation. Jo's art practice integrates storytelling, installation-based art, and electroacoustic soundscapes. Jo has developed community arts projects with various groups including queer youth, consumer/survivors of the mental health system, and migrant domestic workers.  In 2010, Jo graduated from OCAD University with BFA Honours degree in Integrated Media. Advisors in OCADU's Indigenous Visual Culture Program inspired Jo to reconnect with her roots.

 

Casey Mecija

Artist, Musician, Community Organizer

 

Casey Mecija is an accomplished interdisciplinary artist/musician and community organizer. There are two experiences that guide her artistic practice: being a singer/songwriter and her experience as an arts educator. In tandem with her graduate studies in arts education, sociology and equity, and postcolonial theory, Casey aims to create art that signifies the complexity of her personality and desires.

Christine Balmes, MA Candidate

Member, Kapwa Collective; Settlement Worker, North York Community House; MA Candidate, Ontario Institure for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

 

Christine Balmes is a community worker, artist, and performer living in Toronto, Canada. She is a member of Kapwa Collective, a group of Filipino Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers who work towards bridging narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic, and the Filipino and the Canadian. She is also a musician with Pantayo, an all-women kulintang ensemble whose music is grounded in traditional music of the Maguindanaon and T'boli peoples of the Philippines, but explores the possibility of kulintang music influenced by their identities as diasporic Filipinas.

 

About Kapwa Collective:

Kapwa Collective is a group of Filipino Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers who work across different academic and applied disciplines. We believe in the values of inclusivity and accessibility, and we work towards bridging narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic, and the Filipino and the Canadian. We facilitate links among academic, artistic, activist, and other communities in Toronto.